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  • Wed
    26
    Sep
    2018
    7pm – 9pm704 South St

    A discussion with PM Press authors Ward Churchill (Wielding Words Like Weapons) & Matt Meyer (White Lives Matter Most: And Other “Little” White Lies)

    Ward Churchill (Keetoowah Cherokee) was, until moving to Atlanta in 2012, a member of the leadership council of Colorado AIM. A past national spokesperson for the Leonard Peltier Defense Committee and UN delegate for the International Indian Treaty Council, he is a life member of Vietnam Veterans Against the War and currently a member of the Council of Elders of the original Rainbow Coalition, founded by Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton in 1969. Now retired, Churchill was professor of American Indian Studies and chair of the Department of Ethnic Studies until 2005, when he became the focus of a major academic freedom case. Among his two dozen books are the award-winning Agents of Repression (1988, 2002), Fantasies of the Master Race (1992, 1998), Struggle for the Land (1993, 2002), and On the Justice of Roosting Chickens (2003), as well as The COINTELPRO Papers (1990, 2002), A Little Matter of Genocide (1997), Acts of Rebellion (2003), and Kill the Indian, Save the Man (2004).

    Matt Meyer is the International Peace Research Association representative at the United Nations, the national co-chair of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, and the War Resisters’ International Africa Support Network Coordinator. A noted educator, author, and organizer, Meyer focuses on an extensive range of human rights issues including support for political prisoners; solidarity with Puerto Rico, the Black Liberation movement and all decolonization movements; and bringing an end to patriarchy, militarism, and imperialism.

    [Details Here]

  • Fri
    12
    Oct
    2018
    7pm – 9pmWooden Shoe 704 South St

    Join us for an evening of presentation, song, and conversation. Author Mat Callahan will discuss his research and experience about the musical explosion of the sixties and the explosive politics that ignited it. From the Sons of Champlin to the Grateful Dead, from the Black Panthers to the Occupation of Alcatraz, Callahan offers a unique, front row seat at the forces seen and unseen that shaped the era. Then author Aaron Leonard -- drawing on unique material gained from Freedom of Information requests -- will head back to the 1940s-1950s, when artists Pete Seeger, Woody Guthrie, ‘Sis Cunningham, Josh White and other artists seen as partisans of the Communist Party confronted governmental authorities intent of making them renounce their politics or failing that, drive them from the public sphere. Musical savant Dennis O’Neil — steeped in music of both eras -- will frame the event with some of the best selections of both eras.

    [Details Here]

  • Sun
    21
    Oct
    2018
    7pm – 8:30pmWooden Shoe Books, 704 South St

    In 2013, author-activist Nani Ferreira-Mathews traveled on the popular free ten-day "birthright trip to Israel funded by Taglit-Birthright. In her recently released book, Birthright? Travelogue of an American Radical in Israel/Palestine, she covers a day-to-day account that exposes themes of militarism, sexism, and racism on the trip. This book sheds light on the erasure of indigenous cultures and the racism of the state of Israel. It's a must read for those considering going on the trip and for those who work against the occupation.

    [Details Here]

  • Thu
    15
    Nov
    2018
    7pm – 9pmWooden Shoe 704 South St

    On October 13, 1909, Francisco Ferrer, the notorious Catalan anarchist educator and founder of the Modern School, was executed by firing squad. The Spanish government accused him of masterminding the Tragic Week rebellion, while the transnational movement that emerged in his defense argued that he was simply the founder of the groundbreaking Modern School of Barcelona. Was Ferrer a ferocious revolutionary, an ardently nonviolent pedagogue, or something else entirely?

    Anarchist Education and the Modern School is the first historical reader to gather together Ferrer’s writings on rationalist education, revolutionary violence, and the general strike (most translated into English for the first time) and put them into conversation with the letters, speeches, and articles of his comrades, collaborators, and critics to show that the truth about the founder of the Modern School was far more complex than most of his friends or enemies realized. Francisco Ferrer navigated a tempestuous world of anarchist assassins, radical republican conspirators, anticlerical rioters, and freethinking educators to establish the legendary Escuela Moderna and the Modern School movement that his martyrdom propelled around the globe.

    [Details Here]

  • Tue
    04
    Dec
    2018
    7pm – 9pmWooden Shoe Books 704 South St

    When millions of people took to the streets for the 2017 women’s marches, there was an unmistakable air of uprising, a sense that these marches were launching a movement. But the enduring work that protests do often can’t be seen in the moment. It feels powerful to march, but when and how does marching matter? In this original and richly illustrated account, activist and organizer L. A. Kauffman delves into the history of America’s major demonstrations, beginning with the legendary 1963 March on Washington, to reveal what protests accomplish and how their character has shifted over time.

    [Details Here]

  • Mon
    10
    Dec
    2018
    7pm – 9pm704 South St

    With author Nazia Kazi

    Islamophobia, Race, and Global Politics is a powerful introduction to the scope of Islamophobia in the U.S. Drawing on examples such as the legacy of Barack Obama, the mainstream media’s portrayal of Muslims, and the justifications given for some of America’s most recent military endeavors, author Nazia Kazi highlights the vast impact of Islamophobia, connecting this to a long history of US racism. Kazi shows how American Islamophobia and racism are at once domestic—occurring within the borders of the United States—and global—a matter of foreign policy and global politics. Using Islamophobia as a unique case study, Kazi asks the reader to consider how war and empire-building relate to racism. The book sheds light on the diverse experiences of American Muslims, especially the varying ways they have experienced Islamophobia, and confronts some of the misguided attempts to tackle this Islamophobia

    [Details Here]