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  • Wed
    01
    May
    2019
    Fri
    31
    May
    2019

    Against All Authority and Repression!

    In Turin and Trento, 14 people are accused of forming a subversive association, inciting crime, and possessing, manufacturing and transporting explosives to a public place. Furthermore, the operation “Scripta Manent”, where the public prosecutor’s office demands a total of 204 years in prison for the attacks of the Informal Anarchist Federation and the operation “Panico”, where 3 comrades are accused of having attacked a fascist library with an explosive device, is still running.

    Those who have decided to oppose any domination in the social conflict must live with the constant uncertainty of sooner or later being held accountable for their own actions by the opponents of freedom and self-determination. The idea and the longing for a society liberated from exploitation and oppression cab then be nipped in the bud.

    This is especially the case for the anarchist movement in Italy. This is being tackled by the state. The affected prisoners are to be buried alive in their cells with draconian sentences. Their accomplices and the solidarity environment unequivocally profess their permanent enmity against the regime with regard to their kidnapping. The understanding of an anarchism that has set itself the goal of fundamentally criticizing, denouncing and attacking society and its morals of alienation and incapacitation also has an international component. Therefore, the responsibility and solidarity for comrades who fall into captivity lies with all those who recognize themselves in the will to subvert and the ideas of freedom. Yes, the lived subversion puts us in danger, but it also gives us the liberating possibility and moments of self-empowerment and self-determination.

    “I claim being anti-authoritarian, individualist, for insurrection and the destruction of this lurid and fetid existent and of the State-Capital! Forever your enemy! For Anarchy!”

    – Gioacchino Somma, defendant in Operation Scripta Manent

    Aggressive Solidarity, For The Revolt!

    For a Hostile May and a Whole Life Full of Subversion!

    [Details Here]

  • Wed
    01
    May
    2019
    Fri
    31
    May
    2019

    “I will seek at the risk of my life, the best, the authentic freedom …”
    Mauricio Morales

    Ten years ago, on May 22, 2009, an explosive device transported by anarchist comrade Mauricio Morales accidentally exploded before it could be installed in the Gendarmerie School in Santiago, Chile, making itself felt in black hearts. He made that institution and those who compose it visible as an objective to attack, thus generating a close relationship of solidarity between prisoners and action. But at that time the enemy did not receive a blow, this time the roar did not shake the jailers’ infrastructure; at that time the powerful explosion took Mauri’s life during that early morning.

    Quickly the vultures of the different police, prosecutors, journalists and ministers came to scavenge and feast on the blood and body of Mauri. On this occasion, the death of an anarchist was the excuse to develop new thrusts in hunts against anti-authoritarian environments.

    Since then memory has crossed different paths in different languages, continents, from the street, to words, actions and fire. His memory has remained alive in the multiform action that keeps us united with our dead. It is with these gestures that the machinery of oblivion, silence and repentance has been continuously attacked and sabotaged, preventing the decisions of comrade Mauricio Morales to be consumed in time or in the vortex of over-information.

    It’s been 10 years, it’s true sometimes it seems like an eternity and sometimes it’s just a couple of seconds. Today we return strongly to the gestures that have been made permanent during this time, seeking to imbue new energies and transform them into an excellent reason to sharpen our denials of this world: Memory today as yesterday is attack. We do not seek to collaborate in exacerbating a distant, spectacular and superheroic image of our comrade; As always, Mauri was one of those who rejected this world, a companion, not an icon, who, using his ingenuity and will, decided to take action by the confrontation against this imposed reality. That night it could have been him or another compañerx that decided to arm himself with their denials.

    We raise an anarchic and iconoclastic memory, that far from seeking the continuous reaffirmation or the bitter dispute over the property of memory, is directed offensively against this world.

    We call the various companions scattered throughout the world, the tendency which is always a minority, that seeks the destruction of what makes us slaves, the restless minds that contribute to a memory of action against domination. This May, we are aware of the existence of a double dimension , on the one hand, the pretext for anarchic combat and on the other hand the honest sadness for the loss of a beloved companion. We believe that in a complementary way we can multiply and reproduce the gestures of memory: Activities, publications, murals, actions, fires, combat in the streets. Everything works, because nothing is left aside.

    This call is to take back what has never been left behind, giving life to that continuity of practice in the current scenario, contributing so that our deaths remain dangerous to the ears of the powerful, actions which are impossible to recuperate by the “progressive citizens” that separate us and rejecting any victimizing expression that seeks to impose a distorted image of our comrade.

    These words are a call to action and propaganda, to multiply the gestures against Power, gestures that destroy the door of forgetfulness that is sought to put on Mauri, but it is also an invitation to strengthen our capacities, to multiply the instances of memory, to reproduce the combat and generate a contemporary fight against dominion.

    To 10 years: For the offensive memory and a black May in memory of Mauricio Morales.

    Our black memory will continue to resonate in the ruptures of this precious social peace.

    Nothing has finished, everything continues!
    Memory is attack.

    -2019-

    [Details Here]

  • Thu
    23
    May
    2019
    19:00 – 21:00Wooden Shoe Books 704 South St

    Being Numerous: Essays on Non-Fascist Life shatters the mainstream consensus on politics, personhood, and truth, and offers in its place a bracing analysis of a perilous world and how we might live in it. Beginning with an interrogation of what it means to fight fascism, Natasha Lennard explores the limits of individual rights, the criminalization of political dissent, the myths of radical sex, and why we may choose to leave room in our lives for ghosts. At once politically committed and philosophically capacious, Being Numerous is a revaluation of the idea that “the personal is political,” and goes on to ask the central question of our time—how can we live a non-fascist life?

    Natasha Lennard is a contributing writer for the Intercept, and her work has appeared regularly in the New York Times, Nation, Esquire, Vice, Salon, and New Inquiry, among others. She teaches critical journalism at the New School for Social Research, and co-authored Violence: Humans in Dark Times with Brad Evans.
    Vicky Osterweil is a writer, editor and agitator based out of Philadelphia. She is working on a forthcoming book, "In Defense of Looting".

    [Details Here]

  • Fri
    24
    May
    2019
    19:00 – 21:00Wooden Shoe Books and Records, 704 South St

    “They demolish our houses while we build theirs.” This is how a Palestinian stonemason, in line at a checkpoint outside a Jerusalem suburb, described his life to Andrew Ross. Palestinian “stone men,” utilising some of the best-quality dolomitic limestone deposits in the world and drawing on generations of artisanal knowledge, have built almost every state in the Middle East except their own. Today the business of quarrying, cutting, fabrication, and dressing is Palestine’s largest employer and generator of revenue, supplying the construction industry in Israel, along with other Middle East countries and even more overseas.

    Drawing on hundreds of interviews in Palestine and Israel, Ross’s engrossing, surprising, and gracefully written story of this fascinating ancient trade shows how the stones of Palestine, and Palestinian labour, have been used to build out the state of Israel—in the process, constructing “facts on the ground”—even while the industry is central to Palestinians’ own efforts to erect bulwarks against the Occupation. For decades, the hands that built Israel’s houses, schools, offices, bridges, and even its separation barriers have been Palestinian. Looking at the Palestine–Israel conflict in a new light, this book asks how this record of achievement and labour be recognised.

    Andrew Ross is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University and a social activist. A contributor to the Nation, Village Voice, New York Times, and Artforum, he is the author of many books, including, most recently, Bird on Fire: Lessons from the World’s Least Sustainable City and Nice Work if You Get It: Life and Labor in Precarious Times. He lives in New York.

    [Details Here]

  • Mon
    27
    May
    2019
    3:00 pmA-Space, 4722 Baltimore Avenue

    Curious to write to prisoners, but not sure how to start or who to write to?

    Join us for our monthly letter-writing event this month for an intro on how to get started and open discussion on political prisoners who might be seeking more mail or penpals. We will also be distributing our newly-printed Philly ABC guide to supporting political prisoners as a take-home reference, and sending birthday cards to political prisoners with birthdays in June: Matt DeHart (the 10th), Jay Chase (the 11th), and Tom Manning (the 27th).

    We encourage folks who know of prisoners seeking more correspondence to come and spread the word to folks looking to write to people for the first time.

    When: Monday, May 27th; 6:30-8:30pm
    Where: A-Space, 4722 Baltimore Avenue

    Snacks and letter-writing supplies provided!

    [Details Here]

  • Tue
    11
    Jun
    2019

    June 11th: the international day of solidarity with Marius Mason and long-term anarchist prisoners. In the 15 years this tradition has been observed, June 11th has facilitated support and action inspired by imprisoned anarchists — from noise demonstrations outside of jails to letter-writing nights, from fundraisers to arson. Setting aside this day is one way of remembering anarchists who are serving long prison sentences, generating support for them, and inspiring solidarity actions.

    Because social struggles phase in and out, this day is a way to make sure that our imprisoned comrades are not forgotten. Our lack of memory is partially a result of the techno-alienation of the larger culture we’re fighting against. But it’s also a product of the dynamics of the anarchist space. People become burnt out and the cycle of forgetting continues.

    June 11th is a way of combating that amnesia, of trying to sustain a long-term memory in the anarchist space. Not only does this generate support for anarchists locked in the state’s prisons, it forces us to look back at what came before. Considering what previous generations did can both inspire us with ideas we’ve forgotten, and help us understand how our current practices came to be.

    While those of us on the June 11th organizing crew focus on prisoners with long sentences, and sometimes point out how disproportionately long these sentences are based on the justice system’s own sentencing norms, it is not because we are criticizing the government for being unfair. Rather than lobbying for fair sentencing, we seek the total destruction of all prisons: both as physical cages that kidnap people, and as a logic of social control that includes surveillance technologies, parole, and ankle monitors. While we support those who can finagle the state’s own laws to get comrades released as early as possible, we’re committed to those who are still waiting and those for whom this is not possible. We want to push the boundaries of what that commitment means. Our emphasis on long-term sentences is to make sure our comrades continue to receive support as time moves forward.

    The person who has been the focus of June 11th the longest is Marius Mason. Marius is an anarchist, environmental and animal liberation activist who is currently serving a 22 year prison sentence. He plead guilty to taking part in an arson of a Michigan State University lab conducting GMO research for Monsanto in 1999, as well as twelve other acts of property destruction. Marius was imprisoned in 2009 during the Green Scare, a time when the U.S. federal government was cracking down on earth and animal liberation struggles. He was incarcerated in a high security unit until 2017 when, after constant advocacy by outside supporters, he was moved to general population. Finally, earlier this year Marius was moved from Carswell to Danbury, where he is much closer to many of his friends and family. In 2014, he came out publicly as transgender, using he/him pronouns, and eventually secured access to hormone treatment in 2016. For more information, check out the website his support team maintains.

    June 11th, 2019

    We are calling on anarchists around the world to take initiative in whatever way speaks to one’s own heart. In the past, we have seen solidarity attacks, noise demonstrations, graffiti, letter writing nights, dance parties, fundraisers, and much more.

    In the coming months, we will be posting additional content to build up towards June 11, 2019. As always, we welcome posters, art, fliers, prisoner statements, report-backs, communiques, and anything else. Check out june11.org for more information.

    [Details Here]

  • Wed
    12
    Jun
    2019
    19:00 – 21:00Wooden Shoe 704 South Street

    Discussion with AK Press author Ben Dangl

    “Memory as a vision of the future, language as a tool of resistance, oral history as a form of struggle: Dangl gives us a brilliant, in-depth narrative of centuries of resistance grounded in culture. This is a story we should all know and learn from.” —Alessandro Portelli, author of They Say in Harlan County: An Oral History

    After centuries of colonial domination and a twentieth century riddled with dictatorships, indigenous peoples in Bolivia embarked upon a social and political struggle that would change the country forever. As part of that project activists took control of their own history, starting in the 1960s by reaching back to oral traditions and then forward to new forms of print and broadcast media. This book tells the fascinating story of how indigenous Bolivians recovered and popularized histories of past rebellions, political models, and leaders, using them to build movements for rights, land, autonomy, and political power. Drawing from rich archival sources and the author’s lively interviews with indigenous leaders and activist-historians, The Five Hundred Year Rebellion describes how movements tapped into centuries-old veins of oral history and memory to produce manifestos, booklets, and radio programs on histories of resistance, wielding them as tools to expand their struggles and radically transform society.

    [Details Here]

  • Wed
    19
    Jun
    2019

    Revolutionary greetings, Sisters and Brothers!

    It’s that time again and I am sending out this call to action in order to encourage everyone who is passionate about ABOLISHING all forms of SLAVERY and involuntary servitude to get organized and come together in one united action of revolutionary solidarity on June 19, 2019, to protest against enslavement, degradation and dehumanization of Amerikan prisoners and all human beings throughout the world who are subject to any form of SLAVERY or OPPRESSION!

    As many of you know, June 19 is the day when Black people in Texas celebrate the freedom of their ancestors – our ancestors – who were held in slavery for approximately two years after the entire nation acknowledged the emancipation proclamation! But the slave owners in Texas ignored this federal law.

    This year’s call to action has special significance as the world’s eyes are trained on South Texas, where tens of thousands of asylum seekers from Central America come to the United States seeking a safe haven. Instead of safety, they have found mistreatment, abuse, racism and slavery. The legislative and criminal justice system in Texas continues to create the foundations for institutionalized racism and bigotry.

    Do you realize that the U.S. Army had to ride into Galveston, Texas, in 1867 and announce that slavery had been abolished! The 11th state of Texas was so hell bent on maintaining their slaves and profiting from slave labor that the U.S. Army had to show force to make Texas eliminate the practice of slavery! It’s still alive!

    Prison slavery is something that is being practiced in every state in the union and was codified by the most powerful legal document in the United States – the U.S. Constitution. We must continue to call for the exception (slavery) clause in the 13th Amendment to be struck down! We must finish this abolitionist work.

    Remember, sisters and brothers, that this is an international campaign which seeks to address the misogynistic practices of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, as well as the genocide waged against Palestinian people! The bigots who operate Texas prisons wish to silence my voice. However, I refuse to remain silent!

    On June 19, 2019, stand with us! Dare to struggle, dare to win, all power to the people!

    Send our brother some love and light: Keith “Malik” Washington, 1487958, McConnell Unit, 3100 S. Emily Dr., Beeville TX 78102.

    [Details Here]

  • Thu
    20
    Jun
    2019
    7pm – 9pmWooden Shoe Books, 704 South St

    Working-Class Heroes is an organic melding of history, music, and politics that demonstrates with remarkably colorful evidence that workers everywhere will struggle to improve their conditions of life. And among them will be workers who share an insight: in order to better our lot, we must act collectively to change the world. Carefully curated by Mat Callahan and Yvonne Moore, this profusely illustrated treasury of song sheets, lyrics, photographs, histories, and biographical sketches explores the notion that our best hope lies in the capacity of ordinary working people to awaken to the need to emancipate ourselves and all of humanity.

    Featuring over a dozen songwriters, from Joe Hill to Aunt Molly Jackson, Working-Class Heroes delivers a lyrical deathblow to the myth that so-called political songs of the twentieth century were all being written by intellectuals and outside agitators in New York. Many, like Ella May Wiggins, were literally murdered by the bosses. Others, like Sarah Ogan Gunning, watched their children starve to death and their husbands die of black lung, only to rise up singing against the system that caused so much misery. Their heroism resulted not from their being different from their fellow workers but from being the same.

    Most of the songs collected here are from the early twentieth century, yet their striking relevance to current affairs invites us to explore the historical conditions that inspired their creation: deep, systemic crisis, advancing fascism, and the threat of world war. In the face of violent terror, these working-class songwriters bravely stood up to fight oppression. Such courage and heroism is immortal, such heroes should be celebrated and their songs can still lift our spirits, if we sing them today.

    Heroes featured in this twenty-song collection: Sarah Ogan Gunning, Ralph Chaplin, Woody Guthrie, Ella May Wiggins, Joe Hill, Paul Robeson, John Handcox, Aunt Molly Jackson, Jim Garland, Alfred Hayes, Joseph Brandon, and several more anonymous proletarian songwriters whose names have been long forgotten, though their words are immortal.

    [Details Here]

  • Mon
    24
    Jun
    2019
    19:00 – 21:00Wooden Shoe Books, 704 South St

    All City: A Novel is a near-future speculative fiction that addresses climate change and gentrification told from the perspective of those most affected by these scourges. An indictment against the commodification of poverty and the looming threat of climate change, All City tells the story a convenience store worker and a genderqueer anarchist who, together, squat in an abandoned luxury building after a superstorm decimates New York City and the wealthy class flees.

    [Details Here]