If you want to see your event listed send us the details at phillyanticap@riseup.net. When sending us event information please specify if you want us to make a post, add it to the calendar, or both.

  • Sun
    24
    Feb
    2019
    1pm – 4pmWooden Shoe Books, 704 South St

    According to anti-fascist cultural critic Walter Benjamin, people's ideas and actions are often shaped and amplified by images. How, then, should radicals intervene in the image field?

    In this workshop facilitated by AK Thompson (author of Premonitions: Selected Essays on the Culture of Revolt), participants will learn to decipher an image's social resonance while devising strategic responses capable of clarifying political aims and activating constituencies. Through an engagement with case studies, theoretical analyses, and practical activities, we will develop an effective image activism repertoire.

    [Details Here]

  • Sun
    24
    Feb
    2019
    6:00 PM – 8:00 PMA-Space (community center) 4722 Baltimore Ave
    This will be our monthly meeting to discuss, the business, solidarity activities and organizing of the Philadelphia Industrial workers of the World General Membership Branch.
  • Mon
    25
    Feb
    2019
    6:30 pmA-Space, 4722 Baltimore Avenue

    This month we are writing letters to Sean Swain, an anarchist prisoner and jailhouse lawyer who has been held by the Ohio DOC since 1991. Before his incarceration, Sean worked as a union organizer and journalist. A home invasion by the relative of a court official led to Sean’s killing that person in self-defense, within his own home. Nevertheless, Sean was convicted of first-degree murder in 1991. Even though the conviction was overturned in 1993, he has still been held ever since. In 2012, Sean was blamed for a disturbance by a group of prisoners calling themselves the “Army of the 12 Monkeys”, and since then, he has been held in “supermax” (aka solitary confinement) basically every day.

    In spite of his circumstances, Sean has been a huge force for helping fellow prisoners with their cases, and fighting for more livable conditions within the prison walls. He wrote the book “Last Act of the Circus Animals”, and also has a semi-weekly segment on “The Final Straw” podcast. Because he dares to push back, Sean faces massive repression by his captors, including repeated harassment and outright assaults. He has had to go on hunger strike many times, just to obtain basic human dignities. In spite of this, Sean has not lost his spirit or his sense of humor, and loves getting mail from comrades on the outside. Drawings, jokes, and solidarity are particularly encouraged (all of his mail is read by the guards, though).

    If you are unable to make it to the event, you can drop Sean a line at:

    Sean Swain #243-205

    Warren Correctional Institute

    P.O. Box 120

    Lebanon, OH 45036

     

    We will also be sending birthday greetings to political prisoners with birthdays in February and March: Veronza Bowers (Feb 4th), Kamau Sadiki (Feb 19th), Oso Blanco (Feb 26th), Ana Belen Montes (Feb 27th), Joy Powell (Mar 5th), Andrew Mickel (Mar 13th), Ruchell Magee (Mar 17th), and Jaan Laaman (Mar 21st).

    [Details Here]

  • Sat
    02
    Mar
    2019
    1:00 PM – 2:30 PM501 S 52nd St

    Join us on Saturday, March 2nd at 1pm at the Philly Student Union office for a workshop on creating caring, safe communities without the police.

    Free lunch by K’s Kitchen and Childcare provided!

    From its beginnings with slave patrols and strikebreakers, policing serves property over people. This workshop will focus on the practical steps to police abolition. We will be naming community needs, pointing out the ways police use them as an excuse to stay in our neighborhoods, sharing our experiences with policing, and working together to think of other options that we already have or could have in the future. This is a Black and Brown centered, queer friendly, no cop zone. Allies are welcome, but should know to respect the space. Together we can build better ways to keep each other safe.

    [Details Here]

  • Thu
    07
    Mar
    2019
    7pm – 8:30pmWooden Shoe Books, 704 South St

    In the Name of the People is an analysis and reflection on the global populist surge, written from the local forms it takes in the places we inhabit: the United States, Catalonia, France, Italy, Japan, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, Quebec, Russia, and Ukraine. The upheaval and polarizations caused by populist policies around the world indicates above all the urgency to develop a series of planetary revolutionary interpretations, and to make the necessary connections in order to understand and act in the world.

    The ghost of the People has returned to the world stage, claiming to be the only force capable of correcting or taking charge of the excesses of the time. The relationship between the collapse of certain orders, the multiplication of civil wars, and the incessant appeal to the People is clear: as the liberal mode of governance experiences a global legitimation crisis, different forms of right and left populism gain strength within the fractures of ever expanding ruins.

    Populism has now become familiar as a global phenomenon: from the eruptions of the far right in the West to the populist capture of the movement of the squares—Syriza in Greece, Podemos in Spain, the Five Star Movement in Italy, or Our Revolution in the United States—to the electoral victories of Rodrigo Duterte, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, Narendra Modi, Benjamin Netanyahu, Vladimir Putin, Donald Trump, and Brexit, all alongside large populist gains in every European country. While disparate in many ways, these dynamics all share an appeal to combat the rule and sensibility of the elites, with the help of a figure that can channel the affective energies of discontent through operations of identification and exclusion.

    And yet, from the Narodniki to the Black Panthers and Zapatistas, to the emancipatory political movements which expressed themselves as the authentic people—Nuit Debout, the 99%, the indignados—history reminds us of revolutionary populisms.

    How do we distinguish the new from the old? What are their limits and potentials? What is the nature of the affective flows that characterize their relations? How do we address the indeterminacy inherent in mass movements and mobilizations, as well as their confusions, fears, and hesitancies?

    Friends: we pose the question of populism to you because it is the question our time poses to us.

    [Details Here]

  • Wed
    13
    Mar
    2019
    Everywhere!

    What: We are calling for people to organize actions and events in their region. IWOC London will also be organizing a demo, with details to be announced. We encourage groups to not only raise awareness about Kevan but to highlight solitary confinement in their own countries and amplify the voices of those behind bars. It is Kevan’s birthday on the 9th March and we encourage people to also write letters and birthday cards!

    Why: Kevan Thakrar has been fighting for his life for the last 11 years after a wrongful conviction [1]. In 2008 at the aged of 20 Kevan began serving a life sentence, with a minimum term of 35 years, under the highly controversial “joint enterprise” doctrine [2].

    Kevan’s refusal to submit to racist abuse from prison guards has made him a target for reprisals. Notably, in 2010 he suffered a premeditated attack in his cell by HMP Frankland guards. When he fought back he was charged with attempted murder and GBH, and put in solitary confinement, where in one form or another he remains to this day. The charges were sufficiently brazen that a jury cleared him unanimously in a rare victory against the testimony of prison offices.

    Despite his success in court, Kevan has been isolated in Closed Supervision Centres (a ‘prison within a prison’) across the country and currently at HMP Whitemoor. Closed Supervisions Centres are the most extreme form of imprisonment in the UK, modeled on the “supermax” prisons in the United States, and Kevan’s testimony is one of the few sources of information available to those on the outside. They are the ultimate punishment in the British prison system and subject people within them to brutal dehumanisation, degradation and demonisation.

    Kevan Thakrar is a key voice from inside the UK prison today, writing extensively on the conditions endured by people held in the worst prisons in the country. Read his recently published letter that he sent to the Justice Secretary that details the perpetual injustice of his case[3]. You can also read two historical zines published about the CSC written by Kevan distributed by Bristol Anarchist Black Cross [4].

    Kevan continues to suffer both PTSD and further reprisals for shining a light on the abuse suffered by himself and by other incarcerated people, but still refuses to stay silent about the abuses of the prisons system in general and the Closed Supervision System in particular.

    “All I can ever do is drag some of these events into the light. Ignorance can no longer be an excuse for indifference.”
    – Kevan Thakrar

    Support:

    Please send IWOC reports from your actions. Email iwoc@iww.org.uk

    If you would like more information about Kevan or would value support from IWOC to help organise an event/talk/info night please contact us at iwoc@iww.org.uk. We have friends, family and comrades of Kevan who are keen to help share his story, as well as an ex-prisoner who was in the CSC who passionately wants to expose the system.

    [Details Here]

  • Sat
    16
    Mar
    2019

    #JewishSpring has come early this year. Jewish and allied anti-fascists have been busy: shutting down racist rallies in places like Auschwitz and Stone Mountain, confronting fascistic regimes from Washington to Tel Aviv, Brasilia to Budapest, and building broad-based coalitions with people of all backgrounds at the frontlines of the fight against fascism.

    It’s time to come out, wherever we are, and get organized.

    Call to Join Global Day Against Racism and Fascism

    Our aim: To organize in all the places our peoples live, work, play, pray, and fight.

    To this end, we are calling on Jewish antifascists and allies to join in the International Day of Action against Racism and Fascism on and around March 16, 2019.

    For instance, you might organize a Jewish antifascist formation within a larger demonstration. Or you might hold your own rally, speak-out, public assembly, Shabbat dinner, or other solidarity gathering.

    International Call for Writers, Artists, and Translators

    Our aim: To reach our peoples in all the places they live, in all the languages they speak.

    To this end, we invite comrades around the world, Jewish or non-Jewish, to share their skills, whether as writers, artists, or translators, with the international network.

    For instance, you might be able to translate this call to action into your language(s). Or you might want to write your own. You might be an artist, photographer, or designer with a graphic to contribute. Or you might want to collaborate with comrades on an antifascist Haggadah.

    Call for Contributions to This Site and This Struggle

    Our aim: To connect our peoples across borders, and to build our collective capacity for self-defense, self-organization, and self-determination.

    To this end, we are putting out a call for contributions, big or small, to this site and this struggle.

    For instance, you might send out your own call to action to be circulated by #OutliveThem internationally. You might ask for mutual aid, ranging from digital media to material resources. Or you might teach your comrades, and learn from each other, how to fight fascism and win.

    For a future without fascism: For your freedom and ours!

    #OutliveThem #JewishSpring #16M #OLT
    #NoBorders #NoHumanIsIllegal #NoRacismNoFascism
    #BlackLivesMatter #YehudaBiadga #RefugeesWelcome

    wewilloutlivethem@protonmail.com | @outlivethem | outlivethem.wordpress.com

    [Details Here]

  • Thu
    25
    Apr
    2019
    7pm – 8:30pmWooden Shoe Books and Records704 South St

    In the nineteenth century anarchists were accused of conspiracy by governments afraid of revolution, but in the current century various “conspiracy theories” suggest that anarchists are controlled by government itself. The Illuminati were a network of intellectuals who argued for self-government and against private property, yet the public is now often told that they were (and are) the very group that controls governments and defends private property around the world. Intervening in such misinformation, Lagalisse works with primary and secondary sources in multiple languages to set straight the history of the Left and illustrate the actual relationship between revolutionism, pantheistic occult philosophy, and the clandestine fraternity.

    Exploring hidden correspondences between anarchism, Renaissance magic, and New Age movements, Lagalisse also advances critical scholarship regarding leftist attachments to secular politics. Inspired by anthropological fieldwork within today’s anarchist movements, her essay challenges anarchist atheism insofar as it poses practical challenges for coalition politics in today’s world.

    Studying anarchism as a historical object, Occult Features of Anarchism also shows how the development of leftist theory and practice within clandestine masculine public spheres continues to inform contemporary anarchist understandings of the “political,” in which men’s oppression by the state becomes the prototype for power in general. Readers behold how gender and religion become privatized in radical counterculture, a historical process intimately linked to the privatization of gender and religion by the modern nation-state.

    Erica Lagalisse is an anthropologist and writer. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the International Inequalities Institute of the London School of Economics and Political Science, where she is conducting a research project on dynamics surrounding the “conspiracy theory” in social movement spaces.

    [Details Here]

  • Thu
    20
    Jun
    2019
    7pm – 9pmWooden Shoe Books, 704 South St

    Working-Class Heroes is an organic melding of history, music, and politics that demonstrates with remarkably colorful evidence that workers everywhere will struggle to improve their conditions of life. And among them will be workers who share an insight: in order to better our lot, we must act collectively to change the world. Carefully curated by Mat Callahan and Yvonne Moore, this profusely illustrated treasury of song sheets, lyrics, photographs, histories, and biographical sketches explores the notion that our best hope lies in the capacity of ordinary working people to awaken to the need to emancipate ourselves and all of humanity.

    Featuring over a dozen songwriters, from Joe Hill to Aunt Molly Jackson, Working-Class Heroes delivers a lyrical deathblow to the myth that so-called political songs of the twentieth century were all being written by intellectuals and outside agitators in New York. Many, like Ella May Wiggins, were literally murdered by the bosses. Others, like Sarah Ogan Gunning, watched their children starve to death and their husbands die of black lung, only to rise up singing against the system that caused so much misery. Their heroism resulted not from their being different from their fellow workers but from being the same.

    Most of the songs collected here are from the early twentieth century, yet their striking relevance to current affairs invites us to explore the historical conditions that inspired their creation: deep, systemic crisis, advancing fascism, and the threat of world war. In the face of violent terror, these working-class songwriters bravely stood up to fight oppression. Such courage and heroism is immortal, such heroes should be celebrated and their songs can still lift our spirits, if we sing them today.

    Heroes featured in this twenty-song collection: Sarah Ogan Gunning, Ralph Chaplin, Woody Guthrie, Ella May Wiggins, Joe Hill, Paul Robeson, John Handcox, Aunt Molly Jackson, Jim Garland, Alfred Hayes, Joseph Brandon, and several more anonymous proletarian songwriters whose names have been long forgotten, though their words are immortal.

    [Details Here]